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Crime Reduction Toolkits

Domestic Burglary

Crime - Let's bring it down
 
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Toolkit Index

British Crime Survey

The British Crime Survey (BCS) is a very important source of information about levels of crime and public attitudes to crime. The BCS measures the amount of crime in England and Wales by asking people about crimes they have experienced. The British Crime Survey includes crimes that are not reported to the police, so it is an important alternative to police records.

There are a number of reasons for the differences in the level of crimes reported under the British Crime Survey and the level of recorded crime including:

  • the incident was considered too trivial

  • it involved too small a loss to warrant the attention of the police

  • incidents may have been recorded by the police in crime categories outside the comparable crime category;

  • some incidents reported may not be recorded because of police compliance with victimís wishes not to proceed.

  All domestic burglaries1 Attempted burglaries2 Burglaries with entry3 Burglaries with loss4 % change
1999 1,283,000 523,000 760,000 538,000  
2000 1,063,00 466,000 597,000 403,000 -17%

Sources: British Crime Survey 2000 & British Crime Survey 2001

Notes:

1Domestic properties are houses, flats and domestic outhouses or garages linked to a dwelling via a connecting door. Communal areas of multi-occupancy buildings (e.g. hallways) are also included if usually secured. The BCS does not cover crimes against non-domestic properties (e.g. schools or businesses)

2Where the offender tried to gain entry to the dwelling but was unsuccessful.

3Where the offender did gain entry to the home.

4Where the entry involved theft of property.

 

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