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Crime Reduction Toolkits

Domestic Burglary

Crime - Let's bring it down
 
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Toolkit Index

Trends in Burglary

Between 1997 and 1999, the total number of burglaries fell significantly, by 21%. This follows a non-significant fall of 7% between 1995 and 1997. These recent falls reverse the trend of increasing levels of burglary during the 1980s and early 1990s, and the estimated number of burglaries in 1999 is below that in 1991 

Between 1997 and 1999 the number of attempted burglaries and burglaries with loss fell significantly, by 31% and 18% respectively. The number of burglaries with entry fell by 13%, although this was not statistically significant.

As a result of the different trends, the proportion of burglaries in which the offender gained entry has changed over time. In 1981, entry was gained in 63% of burglaries. In 1999 the figure was 59%. The proportion of all burglaries in which property was stolen has also fluctuated over time, being 50% in 1981 and 42% in 1999.

The fall in the number of burglaries between 1997 and 1999 reflects the fall in the proportion of households victimised once or more (from 5.6% in 1997 to 4.3% in 1999). The extent of repeat victimisation has remained relatively stable

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