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Crime Reduction Toolkits

Domestic Burglary

Crime - Let's bring it down
 
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Toolkit Index

Households

The British Crime Survey (BCS) has consistently shown that the risk of burglary victimisation varies considerably across households with different characteristics and situated in different localities.

The figure below shows the types of household most at risk in 1999. They are similar to those identified as being at high risk in 1997.

Click here for a link to a larger version of the above graph

Many of the factors overlap to some degree and it is difficult to distinguish the individual impact of each. For example, low income households are more likely to be found in poorer urban and inner-city areas and are likely to have fewer home security measures

High risks among lower income households may relate to the area in which they are located or low levels of security, or both to varying degrees.

To establish which individual factors are most important in increasing risk, multivariate analysis is required. Such analysis of the 1996 and 1998 BCS concluded that the following factors increase the risk of burglary.

  • lack of security

  • low levels of occupancy

  • living in a detached house

  • living in inner-city areas

  • living in a household in which there is a single adult and children

  • head of household is young

  • household in which the occupants are Asian.

The risk of burglary in rural areas is well below the national average (2.6%). Between 1995 and 1999 the chance of being burgled in rural areas has declined and has remained at a little over half that for non-rural areas.

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