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Crime Reduction Toolkits

Domestic Burglary

Crime - Let's bring it down
 
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Toolkit Index

Costs of Burglary

For burglaries with loss, the average mean gross value of property stolen was 1,273. This average though masks considerable variation. In 27% of burglaries with loss less than 100 worth of property was stolen, while in 32% the loss amounted to a 1,000 or more.

61% of burglaries involved damage to property. This was higher for attempts (73%) than when entry was gained (52%). Soiling and graffiti were rare, occurring in only 1% of all burglaries.

The gross cost of damage averaged 138 for all burglaries. Almost two-thirds involved no damage or damage costing less than 50, but in a tenth the cost of damage amounted to at least 500. Average costs were higher for burglaries with entry (164) than attempts (99).

These costs may well be underestimates; they exclude indirect costs such as loss of earnings due to stolen property

Other costs fall on:

  • Insurers and policy holders

  • Criminal Justice System

  • Business

  • Other householders taking extra security precautions

  • Taxpayers (through lost revenue to the Exchequer)?

In 49% of burglaries where property was stolen or damaged the household was insured 2 , though victims did not always make a claim. In only 53% of burglaries in which the victim was insured was a claim actually made (26% of all burglaries). One implication of these results is that insurance figures are only a partial guide to trends in burglary, since they may reflect changes over time in insurance coverage and claiming behavior.

In total, the BCS estimates that 680 million worth of property was stolen in burglaries in 1999 with the cost of damage amounting to 180 million. 

The most up to date estimate of the average cost of domestic burglary has been calculated as 2300.details in table 4.2 'The economic and social costs of crime' Home Office Research Study 217, www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs/hors217.pdf

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